Hackable hospitals

A feature by Monte Reel and Jordan Robertson for Bloomberg Business looks at the world of security vulnerabilities in medical devices.  The authors look at the findings of a research carried out for the Mayo Clinic on the security of devices used on its premises.  The results are sobering:

“For a full week, the group spent their days looking for backdoors into magnetic resonance imaging scanners, ultrasound equipment, ventilators, electroconvulsive therapy machines, and dozens of other contraptions. The teams gathered each evening inside the hospital to trade casualty reports.

‘Every day, it was like every device on the menu got crushed,’ Rios says. ‘It was all bad. Really, really bad.’ The teams didn’t have time to dive deeply into the vulnerabilities they found, partly because they found so many—defenseless operating systems, generic passwords that couldn’t be changed, and so on.

The Mayo Clinic emerged from those sessions with a fresh set of security requirements for its medical device suppliers, requiring that each device be tested to meet standards before purchasing contracts were signed. Rios applauded the clinic, but he knew that only a few hospitals in the world had the resources and influence to pull that off, and he walked away from the job with an unshakable conviction: Sooner or later, hospitals would be hacked, and patients would be hurt. He’d gotten privileged glimpses into all sorts of sensitive industries, but hospitals seemed at least a decade behind the standard security curve.’

Link: Full article on Bloomberg Business